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Възможен е трибунал заради обеднения уран
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Анонимен
15 Яну 2001 07:53
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Glupostta vi e bezkraina!Evropa i USA sa Hagskiat tribunal!
Анонимен
15 Яну 2001 08:06
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Gluposti! Po-skoro ste dokajat, che uran e polezen za horata! Kade ste vidjali prestipnik da sidi samija sebe si?
Анонимен
15 Яну 2001 10:25
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Само анализи от страни-членки на НАТО ли заслужават да бъдат взети под внимание? Ами ако произхождат от Финландия или Швеция???
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15 Яну 2001 17:12
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Млада колежка почина за няколоко месеца от рак. Нямаше и нищо.
В софийско ябалките поченряха. Белогардчишко - горздето изгни. Всичко е отровено. От уран, диоксин и други химикали. Най-големия хим.комбинат в Европа бе запален от бомбардировките в Югославия. Озонова дупка на Балканския полуостров. Горещина ,суша, ултравиолетово облъчване, радиоктивно облъчване, химическо отравяне - всичко тук в Западна България , Югославия.!!!
ОТРОВИХА НИ! СЪД!
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15 Яну 2001 17:24
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Exposure to Depleted Uranium

A furor has been growing in Europe for weeks over contentions that some allied troops contracted leukemia from exposure to depleted uranium used in NATO ammunition in the Balkans, and that civilians were put at risk by military testing.

But physicists and medical experts say it is biologically impossible for depleted uranium to have caused the leukemia, and they doubt that the metal caused any illnesses in Europe.

If the uranium was causing leukemia, it would presumably do so by emitting radioactive particles that would damage the bone marrow.

But Dr. Frank von Hippel, a physicist who is a professor of public and international affairs at Princeton University, said depleted uranium was not much of a radioactivity hazard. It is what its name implies — depleted. It is what is left when the more highly radioactive uranium 235 has been removed from its more abundant atomic cousin, uranium 238.

Uranium 235 is used to fuel nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. But uranium 238 "is very weakly radioactive," Dr. von Hippel said.

Even if one assumes that there is a ton of depleted uranium dust for every square kilometer in Kosovo, he said, its radiation would be just one one-hundredth, or 1 percent, of the naturally occurring level of radiation in the environment. "So this is not a very significant hazard," he said.

Moreover, uranium 238 emits alpha radiation, said Dr. Michael Thun, who directs epidemiological research for the American Cancer Society, and that radiation does not even penetrate the skin. The radiation that is known to cause leukemia, gamma rays and X-rays, passes through the body and reaches the marrow, damaging cells and giving rise to disease.

Uranium is a heavy metal, and as with all heavy metals it can be toxic. When it enters the body, it lodges in the kidney, which it can damage. But studies of a handful of gulf war soldiers who were hit by friendly fire and left with fragments of uranium 238 in their bodies have been reassuring, said Dr. Charles Phelps, the provost at the University of Rochester and a member of an Institute of Medicine committee that reported on the problem last year.

Uranium 238 clearly was leaching into the soldiers' kidneys, he said. "They had very high levels of uranium salts in their urine," Dr. Phelps said. "But there is no evidence of kidney disease."

Depleted uranium has long been used to strengthen weapons because it is extremely dense, 65 percent denser than lead. A weapon made with depleted uranium can penetrate even steel-armored tanks. It also ignites when it hits.

"When you fire into or through steel, it actually vaporizes the steel," said Dr. Bruce Kelman, a toxicologist who is a president of GlobalTox, a business in Seattle that studies industrial hygiene and toxicology for governments and industry. "You get a mist of depleted uranium and steel."

Dr. von Hippel said that although the metal was radioactive, "its half- life is 4.5 billion years, which is, by coincidence, the age of the solar system." That means that it would take 4.5 billion years for half the uranium 238 atoms in a chunk of the metal to decay by emitting radioactive particles.

Because the radiation does not go to the marrow, it is biologically impossible for depleted uranium to cause leukemia, said Dr. John Boice, scientific director of the International Epidemiology Institute, a research concern in Rockville, Md., and an expert on radiation and cancer.

"To get leukemia," Dr. Boice said, "you need to get the radiation to the bone marrow. And uranium 238 will not get to the bone marrow."

Dr. Bruce Boecker, a radiation biologist at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque, said, "I don't think it causes leukemia at all."

If a person inhales uranium 238, it lodges in the lungs where, in theory at least, it might cause lung cancer or it might travel to the lymph nodes and theoretically cause lymphoma.

But Dr. Boice said extensive studies of workers who processed uranium, some exposed to high levels by breathing uranium dust, did not find any.
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